NOW ACCEPTING

Now Accepting:


Book Blog Tour Requests

Requests to Review:
Horror
Mystery
Suspense
Thriller
Psychological Suspense
Science Fiction
Occult
Fantasy
Speculative Fiction

Mallory Heart Reviews reserves the right to accept or to reject any specific review request. Due to a monumental review backlog, Mallory Heart Reviews cannot promise a specific review date, with the exception of reviews for Release Days and for Blog Tours as arranged in advance.

Contact: archie.standwood.author@Gmail.com
Or Goodreads PM: Mallory Heart Reviews

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Review: UNRELIABLE HISTORIES by. ROB GREGSON



REVIEW: UNRELIABLE HISTORIES by Rob Gregson

If you like your fantasies high-church and solemn, look elsewhere; but if you're into tongue-in-cheek subtle hilarity tucked into the pages of "medieval"-type epic fantasy, stop right here, and read Rob Gregson's UNRELIABLE HISTORIES. Some of his characters are just--well, not really smart enough to be on stage; thank goodness for the intellect and character of Myrah! But what comes away with me from this story is the single funniest apocalyptic scene I have ever read--unforgettable! If you think "The End of The World As We Know It" can't possibly be humorous, get this book and read to the end. I'm still chuckling.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Review: THE KENNEDY IMPERATIVE by Leon Berger. THE KENNEDY TRILOGY BOOK 1. RELEASE





REVIEW:  THE KENNEDY IMPERATIVE by Leon Berger

Leon Berger's THE KENNEDY IMPERATIVE, Book 1  of THE KENNEDY TRILOGY, brings to vivid life an essential historical era more than 5 decades in the past. I lived through this time as a child, so it is doubly exciting to.peruse this novel.  Antihero Philip Marsden, a fluent speaker of Russian and kind of a career wild card, is imported by his employer, the CIA, to.Berlin. to liaise with the military commandant. A few years earlier, during the McCarthy Hysteria, he would have been under suspicion, for his Russian mother. Not.o my Russian, but quite possibly  double agent, as well.

Review: THE TONE POET by Mark Richert





Music thrums the Universe's chords. I've read postulations that Music and Mathematics, so closely are they twinned, are the paired foundations of the Universe. Music is often considered Celestial; are the Angels not believed to strum harps? So, too, do "Near-Death" experiences seem to be accompanied by Music, in addition to white or golden light. Certainly this was true for the child Cameron Blake, near to death in a vehicular crash; he heard Music, and it returned with his soul, reprising itself within elusive nightmares. Yet Music can be turned to discord and chaos: witness the Nazis' utilization of Wagner. Witness, too, the Reverend Alfred Kalek, who in company with his beloved wife reconstituted a nearly destroyed church building; who found her dead inside that church, and tried to commit suicide. But when an alert neighbor rescued him, the good Reverend recovered life, remembering Music, and considered it an act of God. But the first performance of the music in that church, literally birthed something occult and unspeakable.

Review: BUSINESS MAKES STRANGE BEDFELLOWS by E. E. Ottoman. RELEASE




A delightful, antiquarian, occult, sexy LGBTQ tale sure to gratify readers who wish H. P. Lovecraft could have spent more time writing on the Queer slant of horror literaure. Seriously, E. E. Ottoman is a delight, and certainly knows zie way around the tentacular. So relax and ready yourself for a ride through Old New York,  where Science unites with Necromancy, the City is overrun by.a rampaging Cthulhuian nightmare, and vampires pass through lust on the way to True Love.

New Release: THE TREE OF WATER by ELIZABETH HAYDON


Book 4 of THE LOST JOURNALS OF VEN POLYPHEME releases today from Macmillan Tor. Read its description, and watch this space for my Review on November 17, during the Tour.


Description

The epic voyages continue in The Tree of Water, the fourth adventure in bestselling author Elizabeth Haydon’s acclaimed fantasy series for young readers, The Lost Journals of Ven Polypheme.

As Royal Reporter of the land of Serendair, it is the duty of young Charles Magnus "Ven" Polypheme to travel the world and seek out magic hiding in plain sight. But Ven needs to escape the clutches of the nefarious Thief Queen, ruler of the Gated City, whose minions are hunting for him. His friend, the merrow Amariel, has the perfect solution to his dilemma: Ven and Char will join her to explore the world beneath the sea.

As they journey through the sea, Ven finds himself surrounded by wonders greater than he could have ever imagined. But the beauty of the ocean is more than matched by the dangers lurking within its depths, and Ven and his friends soon realize that in order to save thousands of innocent lives, they may have to sacrifice their own. For everything in the ocean needs to eat…

“A delightful epic fantasy that will attract a readership both older and younger than the target audience.” —Booklist (starred review) on The Floating Island

Monday, October 27, 2014

Review: THE FALLEN by Dale Bailey




Review

Where has author  Dale Bailey been all my life?  I had barely started THE FALLEN when I paused to purchase HOUSE OF BONES and SLEEPING POLICEMEN, two more of his books, just so I don't run short.  THE FALLEN is set in really-small-town, coal-mining West Virginia:  beautifully scenic, quiet, and surprisingly peaceful. Well, no mining in decades (yay!) and very, very little crime ever, except in rare, intermittent, cycles--then Life gets ugly. One such cycle sees the death of Reverend Quincy Sleep, whose wife died of cancer during the prior weird cycle. Son Henry Sleep can't feature his father as a suicide, and when he begins to stir up the recent past, he also finds himself 're-acquiring long repressed childhood memories.

Review: GET HAPPY by Mary Amato



REVIEW:  GET HAPPY by Mary Amato

Genetics or kinship of the mind, spirit, and emotions--which delivers the foundation of a stronger bond?  Like the Nature vs. Nurture controversy, perhaps the answer is different according to individual.
Turning 17, Minerva discovers that instead of the ukelele she requested, instead she is.tuned to the truth about her parentage:  father is not the deadbeat absent runaway, but a renowned marine biologist at Chicago's Shedd Aquarium; and he hasn't been avoiding her. Her mother had lied all these years.

Review: THE WOLF IN WINTER by John Connolly. Release Day




REVIEW:  THE WOLF IN WINTER by JOHN CONNOLLY

Only a very few authors can suspend disbelief seamlessly as John Connolly does:  China Mieville, Paul Cornell, Neil Gaiman, Christopher Fowler, among my favorites. Each conceives a reality in which the "Other," the Supernatural, is explicitly as "real" as say, the chair across the room, the window, your office mate. Mr. Connolly here extends the venue of his in-a-category-by-himself private investigator and tragic hero, Charlie Parker (himself legendary and nearly mythological, and about to become even more so during the course of this book)  northwards from Scarborough and Portland, Maine, to a small town, an entity itself, named Prosperous--a community founded by religious dissenters escaping oppression in 17th century England. So goes the known history of this town, a locale which has almost consistently lived according to its name. But great prosperity and security come only at an enormous.price.

Meanwhile Charlie and his closest friends, Louis and Angel, intensify the hunt for the ideology-driven serial murderer known by.the appellation of The Collector; and as Charlie is drawn into the investigation of Prosperous, there will be murders, and rocks turned over, and history unveiled; and for Charlie Parker, there will be unheralded danger.

REVIEW: AN HOUR IN THE DARKNESS by Michael Bailey



REVIEW:  AN HOUR IN THE DARKNESS by Michael Bailey

AN HOUR IN THE DARKNESS is told in first-person narrative by Franklin, an individual who either has a tenuous grasp on reality but a strong imagination; or the capacity to "see beyond." (Rather like the clinical rendition of schizophrenia, isn't it?) Franklin prefers the second option; but since this is purely first-person narrative--how does the reader really know?

Review: THE ELEMENTALISTS by C, Sharp



I'm so thankful this totally cool, delightful, and winningly readable novel is the entry point in a series: The Tipping Point Prophecy. If it is indeed the End of The World As We Know It--well, most of us just weren't expecting dragons--but.that's as it is. I haven't been this excited over a YA since DESTRUCTION  by Sharon  Bayliss, and REMEMBERING KAYLEE COOPER by Christopher French. All 25-star books.

Review: THE KILLER NEXT DOOR by Alex Marwood Release Day



REVIEW:  THE KILLER NEXT DOOR by Alex Marwood

I reviewed a digital ARC provided by the publisher via Penguin FirstRead. Immediately I was riveted, and did not stop till the end. Alex Marwood takes us inside the mind of a serial murderer (I hesitate to say "inside the soul") and this time it is not the garden-variety charismatic sociopath who charms his way through life, but an individual who is a misfit to society. 

Not just that character, but three individuals each "on the run," a landlord with personality disorders, and one normal aging lady add to the true delights of this wonderful novel.

FURTHERMORE